E Scooter Dangers

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Stewart
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E Scooter Dangers

Post by Stewart »

Anybody else been affected by the growing use of so-called E Scooters? I live in Caversham, and they are rife, especially early mornings, with many people opting for them rather than walking or using a cycle.

I very nearly ran over a young lad recently. I also came across one (doing about 30mph) on the narrow road from Emmer Green to Sonning Common.

They are very dangerous and illegal on any road or pavement, it is a £300.000 fine and six points on your driving licence, even if you don't have one, they will be put on if ever you apply.

Not that the Police ever seem to stop or fine riders, not sure if that is just my perception, shortage of Police or they are just not bothering.

I think there has been at least one death reported using them. And most recently, this young 14 year old with a broken leg after being hit by a taxi. The taxi driver was exonerated, as the child should not have been on the road in the first place, and the mother may face charges for supplying the machine to her son. She moans that “If it were a pedestrian or cyclist, it would have been very different". Yes, it would, because both those forms of transport are legal!

https://metro.co.uk/2021/11/10/boy-14-i ... -15575355/

Perhaps we need an advertising campaign as we had in the '70s! Remember those, old Fridges are Dangerous? or Keep away from Pylons government public information adds?
Stewart
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ChipbuttyG
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Re: E Scooter Dangers

Post by ChipbuttyG »

I was coming out of LIDL on the Oxford Road when two went flying past - good job I was aware as they'd gone flying into the side of my car.

My dad regularly goes for a walk in the mornings to get the papers and he's had a couple of near misses when they come flying around the corner on the pavement.
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OLDMAN
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Post by OLDMAN »

There are many reports about of ones getting scooters confiscated / etc done for it etc
But as usual it’s the lack of police that allows it to carry on
The government really does need to get behind the police with better funding (and salaries to attract people) and to allow them back to full capacity
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Ollycat
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Post by Ollycat »

Even when the police do manage to catch them, the courts let them off anyway.
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h3mp
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Post by h3mp »

I liked the idea of having one to begin with, but I would want to use it on the pavement - maybe if they were limited to the same speed as an electric wheelchairs then they wouldn't be an issue....

..but after seeing all the idiots on the roads with them I've gone off the idea..
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chris_j_wood
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Post by chris_j_wood »

One barely missed me on the Oracle Riverside a few months back, before we were allowed to eat and drink indoors. I was crossing from one of the cafes, with a cup of coffee in one hand and a plate of food in the other, to one of the tables there, when he came hurtling out of nowhere. Judging by his shouts after he had swerved to avoid me, he seemed to think it was my fault for being a pedestrian in a pedestrian area.

I've also seen them in London and Bristol, where they are legal provided they are hired from an approved scheme and ridden by somebody with a driving licence. Even so, saw plenty of examples of poor riding, and apparently when you get where you want to go you just abandon the thing on the pavement; they don't half clutter the place up.
Fed-up
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chris_j_wood wrote: 11 Nov 2021 13:29 One barely missed me on the Oracle Riverside a few months back, before we were allowed to eat and drink indoors. I was crossing from one of the cafes, with a cup of coffee in one hand and a plate of food in the other, to one of the tables there, when he came hurtling out of nowhere. Judging by his shouts after he had swerved to avoid me, he seemed to think it was my fault for being a pedestrian in a pedestrian area.
Just to point out that the Oracle Riverside to the south of the Kennet is shared use, not for the exclusive use of pedestrians. Though riding an eScooter here is still illegal because it is allowed on public roads, etc.
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chris_j_wood
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Post by chris_j_wood »

Fed-up wrote: 11 Nov 2021 14:25 Just to point out that the Oracle Riverside to the south of the Kennet is shared use, not for the exclusive use of pedestrians. Though riding an eScooter here is still illegal because it is allowed on public roads, etc.
Never had a problem with cyclists along there. Most of them are Deliverooists anyway, so presumably they reckon running down their customer's customers in front of their customer's premises may not improve their career prospects.
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Post by Fed-up »

chris_j_wood wrote: 11 Nov 2021 14:31
Fed-up wrote: 11 Nov 2021 14:25 Just to point out that the Oracle Riverside to the south of the Kennet is shared use, not for the exclusive use of pedestrians. Though riding an eScooter here is still illegal because it is allowed on public roads, etc.
Never had a problem with cyclists along there. Most of them are Deliverooists anyway, so presumably they reckon running down their customer's customers in front of their customer's premises may not improve their career prospects.
Career prospects and Deliveroo in the same sentence. Not something you hear every day! :roflol3:
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chris_j_wood
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:roflol3:
bert
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Post by bert »

I tried one of the hire schemes in London - you have to scan your driving license when you register, you get a discount if you wear a helmet and they're speed limited to 15mph. They have a license plate on them so if you're caught going through a red light (for example), you get points on your driving license and fined.

When they're regulated like that, I am in favour - a clean and efficient way to get around an urban environment. But yes, the use of private ones by oiks driving them far too quickly is an issue. It's a tricky one to regulate I suppose - each morning I pass quite a few people commuting into town on them in a perfectly safe and respectfully manner (giving way to pedestrians and slowing down when needed), so it would be a shame to punish the responsible users for the behaviour of the oiks.
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MickEdge
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Post by MickEdge »

It’s all to do with this leave the car at home and bus, walk or cycle instead. Nothing wrong that, but e-scooters are a danger. 15mph is much too fast on a pavement, even 10. Since you must be able-bodied to ride one, they should b****y well walk or cycle instead, but it’s too late stop it or educate riders. They think they’re saving the planet.
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chris_j_wood
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Post by chris_j_wood »

On the other hand, my drive home yesterday at about 8pm presented a different picture. I saw several e-scooters on the road, but they were no real problem because they were all well lit. I rather suspect the lights are permanently on or controlled by lighting levels.

I wish I could say the same about the cyclists I came across. I passed about five of them, all on dark coloured bikes, wearing dark clothes and with no sign of either lights or reflectors. Those were the ones I (just about) saw, no idea how many I didn't see and only failed to hit through pure luck. A few years ago bright strobe headlights and projected bike images were all the range, but last night I saw only one of the former and non of the latter. Have they gone out of fashion, or what?. And why so many suicidal bikists?. Is there a shortage of bike lights or batteries?.
ChipbuttyG
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Post by ChipbuttyG »

Some bloke brazenly went through Festival Place on one a couple of months ago.
dave m
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Post by dave m »

There is also a trend for Chinese made 2 stroke motors being added to bicycles.
One west past me at about 30 doing a wheelie.

The obvious problem of adding a motor to a bicycle is that it becomes indisputably a motor cycle, again with no licence or insurance.
Plus they sound like an angry wasp in a can, and don’t have updated brakes
bert
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Post by bert »

MickEdge wrote: 11 Nov 2021 23:24 It’s all to do with this leave the car at home and bus, walk or cycle instead. Nothing wrong that, but e-scooters are a danger. 15mph is much too fast on a pavement, even 10. Since you must be able-bodied to ride one, they should b****y well walk or cycle instead, but it’s too late stop it or educate riders. They think they’re saving the planet.
I agree that driving them at 15mph along a busy shared path would be dangerous, however I wonder if a lot of the perception of danger is similar to cyclists on shared paths? i.e. the pedestrian can be a bit startled by one passing closely as they don't hear it, but unless they were to suddenly jump a foot to the left or right at that exact moment, most of those 'near misses' are probably not that dangerous? I appreciate there are genuine near misses though and don't want to denigrate anyone's experiences there. I also understand there have been injuries and deaths caused by them, but I wonder how those numbers stack up against the alternative transport like bikes and cars.

If you ride your escooter irresponsibly, you'd probably ride your bike irresponsibly too. It would seem a shame to clamp down on them strongly because a minority are pests. Tricky one to try and regulate/legislate I suppose, like you say, perhaps it's too late as the genie is out of the bottle.
chris_j_wood wrote: 12 Nov 2021 08:36I wish I could say the same about the cyclists I came across. I passed about five of them, all on dark coloured bikes, wearing dark clothes and with no sign of either lights or reflectors. Those were the ones I (just about) saw, no idea how many I didn't see and only failed to hit through pure luck. A few years ago bright strobe headlights and projected bike images were all the range, but last night I saw only one of the former and non of the latter. Have they gone out of fashion, or what?. And why so many suicidal bikists?. Is there a shortage of bike lights or batteries?.
I don't get it either - you can get a very bright front and rear light from Amazon that charges via USB for about £10...I wouldn't dream of cycling without lights at this time of the year.

What is even more head scratching is a lot of them are delivery drivers and must spend a lot of time on their bikes. I often see no helmet, no lights, dark clothes and looking at their phone for the next job/route whilst cycling too quickly on an e-bike. It surprises me that delivery companies don't provide lights to their riders to reduce their liability, but then again they don't strike me as the most responsible employers. Oh well, it makes me drive more carefully I suppose! I just fear for their safety.
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Post by dave m »

what doesn't help the e-scooter is the scooter wheels.
Motor scooters have a reputation for suspect handling. and even a 6" wheel doesn't handle pot holes or bumps well.

in the 80's/90's there was a short lived craze for large wheeled scooters - they'd still be a menace if used on electric ones or the road but at least they'd be more predictable.
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piwacket
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Post by piwacket »

chris_j_wood wrote: 12 Nov 2021 08:36 I wish I could say the same about the cyclists I came across. I passed about five of them, all on dark coloured bikes, wearing dark clothes and with no sign of either lights or reflectors.
Twas ever thus around the Uni area, coming home from the theatre at night, I’ve had some very near misses - especially Pepper Lane which is not the most well lit road - especially with the new dim lighting installed. :banghead:
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Post by ChipbuttyG »

And I'll throw in the mix deliveroo etc cyclists, that despite having reflective gear on and lights just ignore the rules of the road because they want to get as many deliveries in as they can so risk life and limb of them and others to do it.
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