The Brexit Effect.

General chat forum
Pooneil
Moderator
Posts: 8134
Joined: 10 May 2011 00:57

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by Pooneil »

Another Brexit dividend - school visits from the continent collapse. https://www.theguardian.com/education/2 ... ump-brexit
Whilst I am a moderator, I am NOT posting in that capacity unless I explicitly say so
User avatar
mikejee
Super Contributor
Posts: 2643
Joined: 22 Sep 2007 15:27

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by mikejee »

Scarcely surprising to anyone of any intelligence.
User avatar
MickEdge
Super Contributor
Posts: 2247
Joined: 08 Jul 2015 14:54

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by MickEdge »

Pooneil wrote: 26 Dec 2021 22:05 Another Brexit dividend - school visits from the continent collapse. https://www.theguardian.com/education/2 ... ump-brexit
It’s a small thing, but a sign of our growing isolation from, influence with and appeal to the rest of the world. If the young don’t want to come here now, then surely they will grow up less likely to consider what the UK has to offer, not having had any personal exposure to this country. Meanwhile the Brexit debate appears to have moved away from the benefits to discussing the extent of the negative affect on our lives and the economy. I know the pandemic makes measuring it difficult, but our recovery does lag behind the EU and the US. Have we managed it or Brexit worse, both or are we just unlucky? The new year brings in put-off import controls and extra food export ones, which will be interesting.
User avatar
BOY RACER
Super Contributor
Posts: 1568
Joined: 04 Oct 2014 19:40

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by BOY RACER »

Well of course in the 19th and 20 th century’s Great Britain was the worlds only Super power. Today it is Russia, (built on our money) America and.China.and we at best are 4th, but for how long . A large number of the worlds leaders came to Great Britain to be educated at Oxbridge and learn democracy and used that to overthrow our regime and rightly so. The British have always been somewhat arrogant looking down their noses on others saying do as I say and not do as I do. They have never been good managers, they always know best. Hence the reason why countries now want to leave the Commonwealth and forge their own destiny. Again rightly so. when we joined the Common Market it was because we thought it would be best FOR US and little thought was given to the commonwealth or the citizens that came to this country to fight fascism. We basically put up two fingers to our commonwealth friends of some 56 nations to align ourselves with some 28 is it European countries. Why? We could get anything we needed from the commonwealth including uranium to make atomic bombs, from Australia and we all need them to be a super power don’t we.

It has been said that the EU owes us nothing. Well I would refute that. We were the only European country to stand up to fascism while every other country ceded to Hitler. Even Russia ceded to Hitler until he turned on them. They are where they are because of us. But I do not blame them for wanting to do what is best for themselves. We have been doing that for some 200 years
So where does that leave us with Brexit. I still believe in Brexit. I do not want to become a Federal State in Europe led by faceless wonders in Brussels led by the Germans as their 4th reich No way. Or have Macron pose as emporer of France and Europe.I suppose he will change his name to Bonaparte.the 4th. Well we known what happened to 1. 2. And 3.so good luck to him

Firstly it would be nice to be led by politicians who have charisma and purpose and leadership. They unfortunately are in short supply. Then I would like us to look after ourselves and not get involved with other countries’ politics and problems, whether right or wrong but which do not affect us. Then to trade deals with our commonwealth friends, Trade with Europe by all means but as an equal and let Europe implode on its own. Perhaps this is being simplistic, but I would like to give it a try
I may be a founder member of the “Grumpy Old Men’s Club” but I never complain. :whistle1:
Pooneil
Moderator
Posts: 8134
Joined: 10 May 2011 00:57

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by Pooneil »

Another great triumph of all those great trade deals we've allegedly negotiated... Presumably "Thick Lizzy" Truss's way of dealing with the outrage of us importing so much cheese a few years ago is, er, to negotiate trade deals that prevent us from exporting any cheese.

Simon Spurrell, the co-founder of the Cheshire Cheese Company, said personal advice from a government minister to pursue non-EU markets to compensate for his losses had proved to be “an expensive joke”. “It turns out our greatest competitor on the planet is the UK government because every time they do a fantastic deal, they kick us out of that market – starting with the Brexit deal,” he said.

His online retail business was hit immediately after the Brexit negotiator David Frost failed to secure a frictionless trade deal addressing sales to individual customers in the EU. Spurrell said he had lost 20% of sales overnight after discovering he needed to provide a £180 health certificate on each order, including gift packs costing £25 or £30. He said the viability of his online retail had come to a “dead stop”.

... Victoria Prentis, a minister at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs... suggested that emerging markets could compensate for the Brexit-related hole in the Cheshire Cheese Company’s finances. Spurrell said he had pursued new business in Norway and Canada but post-Brexit trade deals sealed by the government had put barriers in place.

“We no longer have any ability to deal with the EU as our three distributors in Germany, France and Italy have said we have become too expensive because of the new checks and paperwork. And now we’ve also lost Norway since the trade deal, as duty for wholesale is 273%. Then we tried Canada but what the government didn’t tell us is that duty of 244% is applied on any consignment over $20 [£15].”

That meant Canadian customers who ordered a gift pack worth £50, including transport fees, were asked to pay £178 extra in duty when the courier arrived at their door, Spurrell said. “As you can imagine, customers were saying: ‘You can take that back, we don’t want it anymore’.” Norwegian duty on a £30 cheese pack amounted to £190 extra, he said.


Fully story here.
Whilst I am a moderator, I am NOT posting in that capacity unless I explicitly say so
User avatar
BOY RACER
Super Contributor
Posts: 1568
Joined: 04 Oct 2014 19:40

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by BOY RACER »

Poo, with the greatest of respect none of us thought that leaving the EU was going to be easy. However some of us the struggle would in the end be worth while. Unfortunately this country has lost the British Bulldog spirit and we are to ready to capitulate rather than fight. Again I say look to our commonwealth countries .
I may be a founder member of the “Grumpy Old Men’s Club” but I never complain. :whistle1:
Mayfield
Moderator
Posts: 14161
Joined: 15 Nov 2007 18:50

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by Mayfield »

Like Australia and New Zealand who will, thanks to Ms Truss,
be able to flood the UK with lamb at a price the UK farmer cannot compete with ?

Great (not )
User avatar
MickEdge
Super Contributor
Posts: 2247
Joined: 08 Jul 2015 14:54

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by MickEdge »

BOY RACER wrote: 29 Dec 2021 20:42 Poo, with the greatest of respect none of us thought that leaving the EU was going to be easy. However some of us the struggle would in the end be worth while. Unfortunately this country has lost the British Bulldog spirit and we are to ready to capitulate rather than fight. Again I say look to our commonwealth countries .
I think a great many were persuaded that leaving would be easy, because that’s what they were told by Boris and the leave campaign. You didn’t and decided it was the right thing to do, so I respect that even if I disagree. In my lifetime I’ve not seen that Bulldog spirit. That’s because there’s been no need for it, because of the sacrifices my parent’s generation made. But then they had little choice. Brexit invented an enemy that didn’t exist. There was no threat to our way of life, in the way an invasion by Hitler would have been nor the fear that went with it. That’s why Brexit will never be a success, because I don’t believe the British will accept the kind of sacrifices needed to reconstruct the country. Especially as there is no guarantee it would be any better.
Pooneil
Moderator
Posts: 8134
Joined: 10 May 2011 00:57

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by Pooneil »

BOY RACER wrote: 29 Dec 2021 20:42Poo, with the greatest of respect none of us thought that leaving the EU was going to be easy. However some of us the struggle would in the end be worth while. Unfortunately this country has lost the British Bulldog spirit and we are to ready to capitulate rather than fight. Again I say look to our commonwealth countries .
Like Canada, where as per the article I quoted, our government has screwed over that cheese exporter? How about India? Well, they won't even allow you to export any cheese to them if it is made with rennet of animal origin, and if you do make cheese with vegan rennet, each and every shipment has to be accompanied by a veterinary certificate from the UK authorities confirming that the rennet is vegan (which is not cheap), plus the minimum import duty is 40%, and can be substantially higher. Or how about Australia and New Zealand, where the health regulations on importing dairy products are complex and expensive, in addition to tariffs. (Whilst Australia and NZ do import quite a bit of cheese, much of it is fom each other, and the US. There are significant imports from various EU countries under the EU agreements they have -there are at least 7 EU countries that export more cheese to NZ than the UK, and 7 EU countries that export more cheese to Australia than the UK). Plus of course the commonwealth countries are a lot further away, making transport costs (and therefore the effect on end prices) much more than exporting to Europe.

Looking at the list of countres that currently import the largest amounts of cheese (so where there is already an existing market), Australia is 16th, Canada 24th, Singapore 49th, New Zealand 66th, Cyprus 68th, Trinidad & Tobago 71st, Malta 75th (but they're in the EU), South Africa 76th, Mauritius 79th, Jamaica 84th, Barbados 91st, Sri Lanka 93rd, Namibia 95th and Bahamas 99th. So that's 13 non-EU Commonwealth countries in the top 100, and one of those (Canada is effectively off-limits because of the huge tariffs. So of the 12 remaining, only two are in the top 50. By contrast 5 of the top 6 cheese-importing countries are in the EU, plus Spain at 10th, another 5 EU members between 11 and 20, another 8 between 21 and 30, and another 4 in the top 50. So 19 of the top 30 cheese importing countries are EU members, and we've knackered our ability to export cheese to them. This probably explains why for the first 9 months of 2021, UK cheese exports to the EU were down by 27,832 tonnes on the same period in 2020 (a drop of just over 25%), offset by an increase in non-EU exports of 2,436 tonnes (an increase of just over 10%. I'm really ot seeing your suggestion of the Commmonwelath being a great deal of hope to this cheesemaker, when you look at the size of the market he's been chopped out of.

You could eat raw bulldogs for a month of Sundays, but your "bulldog spirit" will not cancel out simple economic realities like very few people are going to pay 2,3 4 or even 7 times the local price, no matter how good your product. I'm afraid that blaming the simple maths of a product being massively financially unattractive on a lack of "British Bulldog spirit" is not helpful, IMHO.
Whilst I am a moderator, I am NOT posting in that capacity unless I explicitly say so
ChipbuttyG
Super Contributor
Posts: 789
Joined: 13 Sep 2021 09:50

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by ChipbuttyG »

MickEdge wrote: 30 Dec 2021 09:00
BOY RACER wrote: 29 Dec 2021 20:42 Poo, with the greatest of respect none of us thought that leaving the EU was going to be easy. However some of us the struggle would in the end be worth while. Unfortunately this country has lost the British Bulldog spirit and we are to ready to capitulate rather than fight. Again I say look to our commonwealth countries .
I think a great many were persuaded that leaving would be easy, because that’s what they were told by Boris and the leave campaign. You didn’t and decided it was the right thing to do, so I respect that even if I disagree. In my lifetime I’ve not seen that Bulldog spirit. That’s because there’s been no need for it, because of the sacrifices my parent’s generation made. But then they had little choice. Brexit invented an enemy that didn’t exist. There was no threat to our way of life, in the way an invasion by Hitler would have been nor the fear that went with it. That’s why Brexit will never be a success, because I don’t believe the British will accept the kind of sacrifices needed to reconstruct the country. Especially as there is no guarantee it would be any better.
I think that many were capable of making their own minds up, leave or remain. Leave won. We move on. Let's look for solutions rather than waste time on pointing the finger.
User avatar
MickEdge
Super Contributor
Posts: 2247
Joined: 08 Jul 2015 14:54

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by MickEdge »

ChipbuttyG wrote: 19 Jan 2022 12:14
MickEdge wrote: 30 Dec 2021 09:00
BOY RACER wrote: 29 Dec 2021 20:42 Poo, with the greatest of respect none of us thought that leaving the EU was going to be easy. However some of us the struggle would in the end be worth while. Unfortunately this country has lost the British Bulldog spirit and we are to ready to capitulate rather than fight. Again I say look to our commonwealth countries .
I think a great many were persuaded that leaving would be easy, because that’s what they were told by Boris and the leave campaign. You didn’t and decided it was the right thing to do, so I respect that even if I disagree. In my lifetime I’ve not seen that Bulldog spirit. That’s because there’s been no need for it, because of the sacrifices my parent’s generation made. But then they had little choice. Brexit invented an enemy that didn’t exist. There was no threat to our way of life, in the way an invasion by Hitler would have been nor the fear that went with it. That’s why Brexit will never be a success, because I don’t believe the British will accept the kind of sacrifices needed to reconstruct the country. Especially as there is no guarantee it would be any better.
I think that many were capable of making their own minds up, leave or remain. Leave won. We move on. Let's look for solutions rather than waste time on pointing the finger.
If we should be looking for solutions that implies there’s a problem. I wonder what that is. I’d like to move on, but where are those solutions and how long have I got wait.
User avatar
mikejee
Super Contributor
Posts: 2643
Joined: 22 Sep 2007 15:27

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by mikejee »

MickEdge wrote: 19 Jan 2022 14:51
ChipbuttyG wrote: 19 Jan 2022 12:14
MickEdge wrote: 30 Dec 2021 09:00
I think a great many were persuaded that leaving would be easy, because that’s what they were told by Boris and the leave campaign. You didn’t and decided it was the right thing to do, so I respect that even if I disagree. In my lifetime I’ve not seen that Bulldog spirit. That’s because there’s been no need for it, because of the sacrifices my parent’s generation made. But then they had little choice. Brexit invented an enemy that didn’t exist. There was no threat to our way of life, in the way an invasion by Hitler would have been nor the fear that went with it. That’s why Brexit will never be a success, because I don’t believe the British will accept the kind of sacrifices needed to reconstruct the country. Especially as there is no guarantee it would be any better.
I think that many were capable of making their own minds up, leave or remain. Leave won. We move on. Let's look for solutions rather than waste time on pointing the finger.
If we should be looking for solutions that implies there’s a problem. I wonder what that is. I’d like to move on, but where are those solutions and how long have I got wait.
Quite simple - Rise prices and therefore reduce the standard of living of most of us, not of course those in charge who have excessive salaries, as would have been obvious to those who pushed it, but then they were not really interested in others but their own outdated philosophy, and in many cases ,personal profit
ChipbuttyG
Super Contributor
Posts: 789
Joined: 13 Sep 2021 09:50

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by ChipbuttyG »

There's always problems, brexit or no brexit. Or was being a member of the EU plain sailing all the way....LOL.
Mayfield
Moderator
Posts: 14161
Joined: 15 Nov 2007 18:50

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by Mayfield »

Isn’t one of the problems that our current PM got us out of the EU based on a tissue of lies, and now , true to form, he seems to have a rather tenuous relationship with the truth, people, who are finding their budgets stretched are wondering why we ever believed him
ChipbuttyG
Super Contributor
Posts: 789
Joined: 13 Sep 2021 09:50

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by ChipbuttyG »

Politics is full of lies everywhere you look.

I've been lied to many times by Reading Labour Councillors (Who voted remain). Other parties 'lies' are terrible if it doesn't suit their agenda, but when they lie, it's OK. They either go quiet when you catch them out, or they try and worm their way out of it.

Politics stinks.
User avatar
MickEdge
Super Contributor
Posts: 2247
Joined: 08 Jul 2015 14:54

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by MickEdge »

ChipbuttyG wrote: 20 Jan 2022 09:31 There's always problems, brexit or no brexit. Or was being a member of the EU plain sailing all the way....LOL.
So, all we’ve done is exchanged one set of problems for another. As you say LOL.
ChipbuttyG
Super Contributor
Posts: 789
Joined: 13 Sep 2021 09:50

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by ChipbuttyG »

MickEdge wrote: 20 Jan 2022 10:54
ChipbuttyG wrote: 20 Jan 2022 09:31 There's always problems, brexit or no brexit. Or was being a member of the EU plain sailing all the way....LOL.
So, all we’ve done is exchanged one set of problems for another. As you say LOL.
Yep. And we're not paying the EU £350m a week.
Pooneil
Moderator
Posts: 8134
Joined: 10 May 2011 00:57

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by Pooneil »

ChipbuttyG wrote: 20 Jan 2022 11:20
MickEdge wrote: 20 Jan 2022 10:54
ChipbuttyG wrote: 20 Jan 2022 09:31 There's always problems, brexit or no brexit. Or was being a member of the EU plain sailing all the way....LOL.
So, all we’ve done is exchanged one set of problems for another. As you say LOL.
Yep. And we're not paying the EU £350m a week.
And we never were.
Whilst I am a moderator, I am NOT posting in that capacity unless I explicitly say so
User avatar
chris_j_wood
Super Contributor
Posts: 6072
Joined: 15 Jun 2009 13:10

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by chris_j_wood »

ChipbuttyG wrote: 20 Jan 2022 09:31 There's always problems, brexit or no brexit. Or was being a member of the EU plain sailing all the way....LOL.
So it is just a coincidence is it, that I spent my youth watching TV news bulletins where the lead story was always one of 'balance of payments crisis', 'rate of inflation', the 'brain drain', or the 'cold war'. Then we joined the EU, and after a while all those pretty well disappeared. Then we left the EU, and after a while all those have reappeared.

With the exception of silly made up and rather trivial stories about straight bananas, burgundy passports, and the like, I cannot recall anything much in the way of problems with the EU. Perhaps you could remind me of some of the serious issues we had with EU membership, and how having left has resolved them. I appreciate we have only just left, so starting to resolve them would probably suffice for now.
User avatar
MickEdge
Super Contributor
Posts: 2247
Joined: 08 Jul 2015 14:54

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by MickEdge »

The home page of The Conservative Party website says “We’ve got Brexit done so we can invest in our NHS….”. But then on their NHS page I see “That’s why we need to get Brexit done….” I’m confused have we or haven’t we got Brexit done? Perhaps they are still searching for that £350m a week. Surely, after 12 months £18 billion can’t be hard to spot.
Frank Blank
Super Contributor
Posts: 680
Joined: 20 Jul 2017 16:39

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by Frank Blank »

Pretty much encapsulates where we are with regards Putin/Ukraine.

"Piotr Buras, of the European Council on Foreign Relations, calls the episode “the EU’s unforgivable failure”, a malady of wishful thinking, posturing, incompetence, and lack of follow-through. “The European security architecture is in tatters,” he said.

In the meantime, Germany offers to supply 5000 military helmets to Ukraine to help defend against a possible Russian invasion- an offer Kyiv mayor and former world champion boxer Vitali Klitschko dismissed as “a joke” that left him “speechless"

More importantly, he also posed the following question. "What will they send next? Pillows ?"

The EU is a joke - marginalised as it has been by the Americans and NATO.
'Let's Go Brandon'
User avatar
MickEdge
Super Contributor
Posts: 2247
Joined: 08 Jul 2015 14:54

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by MickEdge »

Still struggling to justify Brexit, after all this time.
User avatar
mikejee
Super Contributor
Posts: 2643
Joined: 22 Sep 2007 15:27

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by mikejee »

And still calling the EU a joke, when the biggest, and saddest , joke of all time is Britain and US electing the clowns Trump and Johnson
User avatar
chris_j_wood
Super Contributor
Posts: 6072
Joined: 15 Jun 2009 13:10

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by chris_j_wood »

Sadly, shows just how effective Putin's tactics of dividing the west has been. He has been very astute in selecting his agents to sow dissension and division, especially in the UK and US, and so many of the voters of both countries fell for it. Now he can embark on phase 2, and send in his troops.

Just shows how right Winston Churchill was in advocating a 'United States of Europe'. He was no blinkered Little Englander, and understood the rules of realpolitik.
ChipbuttyG
Super Contributor
Posts: 789
Joined: 13 Sep 2021 09:50

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by ChipbuttyG »

I never understood that phrase "Little Englander" when it comes to leaving the EU. We've opened ourselves up to the rest of the World trade wise so it doesn't make any sense.
dave m
Super Contributor
Posts: 4651
Joined: 21 Feb 2012 11:21

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by dave m »

I can.
It's the supreme confidence that we can scrap our relationship with our closest marketplace and assume that countries will be banging on our door.
Strangely, few of these countries are interested in the slightest, and sales are likely to be a fraction of what we had to the EU.

Plus our existing EU food standards, which we are set up to produce, may have to be compromised by any "Quid Pro Quo" with overseas producers.
More New Zealand Lamb produced to lower standards than our own is now in competition with UK farmers.
Brilliant
User avatar
MickEdge
Super Contributor
Posts: 2247
Joined: 08 Jul 2015 14:54

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by MickEdge »

It seems that despite some optimism that came with Liz Truss’s becoming our chief Brexit negotiator, the Northern Ireland protocol negotiations remain at a standstill or going round in circles, with neither side wanting to budge until Boris’s long term future is decided, if it can be. Truss can’t be seen to compromise as it might damage her leadership chances, and neither will the EU because a new PM, not closely associated with Brexit agreement, may be more willing to compromise. So now Boris becomes an obstacle to Brexit.
User avatar
mikejee
Super Contributor
Posts: 2643
Joined: 22 Sep 2007 15:27

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by mikejee »

And now we learn that the Truss cost the taxpayer , those that actually work to produce something , rather than party, manipulate and copulate, £500,000 on a privately hired plane to pay a visit to Australia. And some say the government is not corrupt!!
User avatar
MickEdge
Super Contributor
Posts: 2247
Joined: 08 Jul 2015 14:54

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by MickEdge »

mikejee wrote: 27 Jan 2022 18:38 And now we learn that the Truss cost the taxpayer , those that actually work to produce something , rather than party, manipulate and copulate, £500,000 on a privately hired plane to pay a visit to Australia. And some say the government is not corrupt!!
Money well spent on training a possible future PM, Mike. She did the tank lady foundation course, so now the serious ego building stage of your own 300 seater plane and an entourage of just 14. It would only have saved a piddling £300,000 going by BA, and what wannabe PM puts damage to the climate above personal self esteem.
User avatar
chris_j_wood
Super Contributor
Posts: 6072
Joined: 15 Jun 2009 13:10

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by chris_j_wood »

mikejee wrote: 27 Jan 2022 18:38 And now we learn that the Truss cost the taxpayer , those that actually work to produce something , rather than party, manipulate and copulate, £500,000 on a privately hired plane to pay a visit to Australia. And some say the government is not corrupt!!
Well at least her extravagance met the current government's mandatory incompetence quota. The plane she hired was an Airbus A321, intended for short to medium haul services. So as a result it had to land to refuel twice on the way to Australia, thus giving her an insight into the old air routes of the mid-20th century. And taking five hours longer outbound and nine hours longer inbound than the equivalent bog-standard airliner flights.

Definitely a chip off the Boris block.
ChipbuttyG
Super Contributor
Posts: 789
Joined: 13 Sep 2021 09:50

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by ChipbuttyG »

dave m wrote: 27 Jan 2022 16:35 I can.
It's the supreme confidence that we can scrap our relationship with our closest marketplace and assume that countries will be banging on our door.
Strangely, few of these countries are interested in the slightest, and sales are likely to be a fraction of what we had to the EU.

Plus our existing EU food standards, which we are set up to produce, may have to be compromised by any "Quid Pro Quo" with overseas producers.
More New Zealand Lamb produced to lower standards than our own is now in competition with UK farmers.
Brilliant
Ah yeah, the EU food standards. Horse burger anyone?
ChipbuttyG
Super Contributor
Posts: 789
Joined: 13 Sep 2021 09:50

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by ChipbuttyG »

mikejee wrote: 27 Jan 2022 18:38 And now we learn that the Truss cost the taxpayer , those that actually work to produce something , rather than party, manipulate and copulate, £500,000 on a privately hired plane to pay a visit to Australia. And some say the government is not corrupt!!
Yes I get that. Why aren't some of you as outraged at the millions and millions Reading Council waste?
User avatar
Hooped
Super Contributor
Posts: 1730
Joined: 10 May 2017 13:43

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by Hooped »

Probably because a good many of us don't live in Reading any more!
ChipbuttyG
Super Contributor
Posts: 789
Joined: 13 Sep 2021 09:50

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by ChipbuttyG »

Why did you all move away ?
User avatar
chris_j_wood
Super Contributor
Posts: 6072
Joined: 15 Jun 2009 13:10

Re: The Brexit Effect.

Post by chris_j_wood »

ChipbuttyG wrote: 28 Jan 2022 10:11 Why did you all move away ?
How is your move to Hastings coming along?.
Post Reply

Return to “Chatty Person”